Friday, July 12, 2013

Number 28: Copper Breaks State Park

I have taken a few days off from state park posts, but I still have 4 to tell you about from our trip last week.  This one is called Copper Breaks State Park in Quanah, Texas (otherwise known as The Middle of Nowhere).


The views from the high road show just how vast this park is.

The canyons here are not deep, but deep enough to show off the red rock cliffs that are everywhere.


And what happens when it's 104 degrees with a heat index of an-oven-primed-for-baking-cookies, and the wind is blowing at 20+ mph, and you have your telephoto lens on, and you come across something cool up-close to take a picture of, and you were wishing you had your macro lens?  You take the picture anyway and have regret for the rest of your life that you didn't trudge back to the car to swap out lenses.  This is a very large snake skin (4 footer), out of focus due to my heat induced laziness.


Insert lyrics from Seals and Croft's "We May Never Pass This Way Again."  Shed a tear.  Lesson learned.  Now let us move on.


There is a lake and two ponds that are very low on water.

Copper Breaks Lake
This one was so low that the fishing pier was closed and completely beached on land.  The lake normally would be up several feet so this dock could float.


Here is a sign on this lake posting the swimming rules in a spot where there is no longer water.


The other lake was just as low, but we enjoyed our walk around it taking in the small canyon's beauty.

Copper Lakes Big Pond

There were dragonflies by the dozen swarming around the lake.  I love their goofy little faces.


The shore was covered in small animal footprints, obviously the critters are still drawn to the water no mater how low the levels.



There was one casualty; my shoes when I stepped on what appeared to be dry, cracked mud which turned out to be what we affectionately came to refer to as future petroleum.  Yep, it smelled.


I have no pictures of the small pond, because at this time it appeared completely dry.  To spite (or in spite of) the lack of water in the lakes, obvious draw for visitors, there were plenty of campers.  Campers in tents and RVs were set for the Fourth of July weekend.   The park has ten miles of trails here with both horses and ATVs welcome, though I will say I prefer my hiking under the shade of tall trees.